RE/MAX Executive Realty



Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 1/12/2020

If you've lived in your home for more than a couple years, chances are you've grown rather attached to it. Whether you're selling your house because your family has outgrown it or your company has transferred you to another location, you're probably attaching a lot of sentimental value to the price tag. Unfortunately, sentimental value does not translate into dollars and cents in today's real estate market.

The emotions of prospective buyers will often play a role in their decision to make on offer on your house, but they're probably not going to pay more than the market value for your property -- unless there's a bidding war situation going on. One of the best ways to determine a fair and reasonable asking price for your home is to have it appraised by an experienced real estate agent. Their appraisal will be based on objective data, such as the selling price of comparable homes in your area. The location and condition of your home will have a bearing on pricing your home effectively, as will the prevailing market conditions and other factors. Although online estimates can sometimes give you a ballpark figure of what your house may be worth, a local appraisal is more accurate

A common misconception among homeowners is that a $10,000 home improvement expenditure should justify a $10,000 increase in the selling price of a home. Although that concept may seem logical, it unfortunately doesn't work that way in the real estate market. An updated kitchen, bathroom, or roof may make your house more appealing to prospective buyers and help it sell faster, but it probably won't have a dollar-for-dollar impact on the price buyers would be willing to pay. Since each selling situation is unique, however, your local real estate agent is the best person to consult regarding a fair asking price for your home.

Avoiding Home Seller Mistakes

In addition to overpricing their home, another mistake home sellers make involves three related activities: decorating, staging, and attempting to create curb appeal. In spite of a homeowner's best intentions, their decorating and home staging ideas may clash with those of the house-buying public. When you attempt to tackle home staging on your own, several things could go wrong.

  • You could either spend too much or too little on making repairs and sprucing up your home's appearance.
  • You could spend your time and money upgrading inconsequential features of your home, while overlooking the real important changes that need to be made.
In either case, you're missing the mark when it comes to maximizing the marketability of your home. That's why it pays to take advantage of the knowledge, expertise, and objectivity of a professional real estate agent. Their recommendations on pricing and home staging will be based on experience, best practices, objective criteria, and current market conditions.





Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 1/12/2020

Image by Susan Lowry Hare from Pixabay

Adirondack chairs are popular on decks and for outdoor living, though they also look great in a rustic living room or cabin!  Rather than being straight-backed and uncomfortable, their design make them a joy to sit in.  However, a finished Adirondack chair can up to $700 dollars, whereas materials will run you between $50 and $150 depending on the wood you choose to use. Check out how to make your very own Adirondack chair by following the instructions below.

Note: you will need a miter saw and a jigsaw to complete this project.

Materials

Lumber

  • One 2" x 2" x 6' footboard
  • Three 2" x 4" x 8' footboards
  • Four 1" x 4" x 8' footboards
  • Hardware

  • 2-inch screws
  • 2-inch deck screws
  • 4-inch deck screws
  • 1 1/2-inch deck screws or exterior screws
  • Other

  • Wood glue
  • Directions

    A) Cutting the planks to size

    1. For the stretcher boards
      Cut two 2 x 4s such that the long end measures 31 7/8".  One end should be cut to 20o off of square at the shortest point; the other end should be cut to 35off square at the longest point. Then, mark off 2" on the 20o square end and cut at a right angle (90o) to your 20o cut. 

      If you aren't sure how to measure a certain number of degrees off of square, check out this quick how-to here
    2. For the legs
      Cut two, 2" x 4" planks to 20 3/4".  Cut both ends parallel, 15o off square.  These will be the back legs.  For the front legs, cut two, 2" x 4" planks to 20" long.
    3. For the seat
      Cut five, 1" x 4" planks to 22 1/2".
    4. For the arms of the chair:
      Cut two, 1" x 4" planks to 27".
    5. For the arm rest support:
      Cut two, 2" x 2" planks to 26 1/2".  Cut one end at 15o off square.
    6. For the back support and front apron:
      Cut two2" x 4" planks to 22 1/2".
    7. For the back slats:
      Cut five1" x 4" planks to 36".
    8. For the top support section:
      Cut one, 1" x 4" board to 19 1/2".
    9. For the base support section:
      Cut one2" x 4" board to 19 1/2".

    B) Building the legs

    1. Using 2 1/2" deck screws, attach both back and front legs to an arm support, keeping the outside and top edges even.  Use clamps and wood glue for additional stability.
    2. Turn the front leg such that the arm support faces downward on your bench, and elevate off the bench using 2x4s.  Measure 13 3/4" from the base of your front leg on the left-hand side, and mark.  On the same leg, measure 1/2" horizontally and mark.   Line up your stretcher such that the 20o off of square side lines up with your two marked measurements.  The 35off square side should now line up to the base on the right.  Fix in place with 2 1/2" deck screws.  Use wood glue for additional stability.
    3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 to make your second leg.
    4. Using 2 1/2" deck screws and wood glue, attach the front apron such that it lines up with the stretcher board on each side.

    C) Making the seat

    Drill two pilot holes on each side of your seat slats, using a countersink bit to keep the wood intact.  Line up on the top of the stretcher and screw into place using the 2" screws, being sure to put a 1/2" gap between each slat.  Do not use wood glue on the seat slats; they will naturally move more than the rest of the chair.
    Note: it helps to lay out all the slats first, screwing in the outermost slats before the others and adjusting as you go, so that the spacing is right.

    D) Making the back

    1. Turn the chair upright with the back towards you.  You will note that the back support board is wider than width of the legs to which it must be affixed.  Attach the back support to both of the back legs at an angle, such that the distal side is pointed upward and the proximal side is pointed downward until flush with both sides.  Use 2 1/2" deck screws and wood glue to affix.
    2. Attach the back slats as you did the seat slats in Part C: 1/2" apart, using 2" screws at the base but with 1 1/4" exterior screws at the top.  Do not use wood glue on the slats, as they will naturally need a bit more flexibility.  
      Note: it helps to lay out all the slats first, screwing in the outermost slats before the others and adjusting as you go, so that the spacing is right.
    3. Using a bucket, trash bin, or other large, circular item as a guide, draw an arc at the top of your back slats.  Then, using your jigsaw, make the cut.
    4. Slide the finished back into place in your chair.  Secure with 2 1/2" deck screws.  Finally, screw the chair back into the back support with 2" deck screws.

    Finishing touches

    1. Finish the chair by screwing the armrests into the arm supports using 2" deck screws and wood glue, clamping into place.  
    2. After all your glue has cured as per the instructions on your wood glue, sand any jagged edges, particularly the top of the chair back.
    3. Finally, paint or spray with at least two coats of finish: a clear coat if you really like the look of your wood.





    Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 1/12/2020

    If you've bought a home that includes kitchen appliances, you may need to sell your current appliances before moving day. Fortunately, if you host a garage sale, you can sell a wide range of kitchen appliances in no time at all.

    Some of the most popular kitchen appliances to sell at a garage sale include:

    1. Refrigerator

    In many instances, a homebuyer will request a refrigerator in a home offer. And if the seller accepts this proposal, a property buyer may need to get rid of his or her current refrigerator quickly.

    Selling your refrigerator during your garage sale offers several benefits. First, you may be able to earn several hundred dollars for your refrigerator if it looks and performs great. You also can sell your refrigerator before your move, thereby eliminating the risk that you'll have to relocate this large, heavy appliance to your new address.

    Evaluate the age and condition of your refrigerator prior to pricing it. That way, you can establish a competitive price for your appliance.

    In addition, spend some time cleaning your refrigerator's interior and exterior. This will increase the likelihood that your refrigerator will stir up interest from garage sale shoppers.

    2. Microwave

    Although your kitchen microwave has served you well for many years, you likely have no need for two microwaves at your new address. Luckily, you can sell your current microwave now to earn extra cash prior to moving day.

    Many microwaves are available, and as such, you'll want to learn as much as possible about your microwave. This will enable you to provide garage sale shoppers with plenty of information about your microwave's features.

    Don't forget to test and clean your microwave before you add it to your garage sale inventory. By doing so, you can guarantee your microwave performs correctly and looks outstanding when you try to sell it during your garage sale.

    3. Toaster

    Your toaster has been a mainstay in your kitchen, but there may be no time like the present to sell it.

    Remove crumbs and other food particles from your toaster as soon as possible. These particles can affect a toaster's performance, and in some instances, create fire hazards.

    Furthermore, wipe down your toaster's exterior. An in-depth toaster cleaning will help you generate interest in your appliance during your garage sale.

    Kitchen appliances usually are in high demand among garage sale shoppers. If you dedicate the necessary time and resources to clean and maintain these items, you should have no trouble selling them at a garage sale.

    Lastly, if you plan to buy a home in the near future, you may want to consult with a real estate agent. This housing market professional can keep you up to date about new homes as they hit the market and help you submit offers on houses. Plus, a real estate agent will make it easy to plan ahead for a pre-moving day garage sale and ensure you can enjoy a seamless transition from one address to another.




    Tags: kitchen   garage sale  
    Categories: Uncategorized  


    Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 1/5/2020


     

    Photo by Harry Strauss via Pixabay 

    Whether it’s one room in your home that’s a little too small for your needs, or you’re living in a more cozy space than you’d prefer, sometimes you just want your space to feel larger than it is. This is particularly true if you are getting ready to list a home for sale, as homes that feel large are likely to sell more quickly than homes that feel cramped. If you’re craving more space, careful placement of your decor and furnishings will help open up the space and make it feel larger than life.

    Raise the Curtains

    One strategy to make your home seem larger is to raise the curtains. Rather than hanging them at the top of the window, hang them near the ceiling and allow them to drape from floor to ceiling. This will make the ceiling look taller, and that will make the room feel larger.

    Add Light

    Dark spaces feel small and confined, while well-lit spaces feel large. If the room has dark areas, add some lighting to brighten them up. This can add a feeling of space to an otherwise dark area.

    Make Your Decorations Bigger

    Clutter is the enemy when you’re trying to make your space feel larger, but not all clutter is simply because you’re bad at putting things away. Sometimes clutter comes from too many decorations. A few large items, rather than a lot of small ones, can make the space feel larger. If you are adding vases, candles, and similar tabletop decor, limit yourself to just a few. Create small arrangements on nightstands or coffee tables that will draw the eye into the room, and leave other areas open.

    Similarly, instead of making a wall that has many small pieces of art on it, display one larger item. Give yourself the freedom to leave some walls blank, as this will actually make the space feel larger.

    Strategically Place Mirrors to Reflect Light

    Mirrors are quite helpful in opening up a space, but they need to be placed well. If you place mirrors so they bounce light from windows or in a space that makes the room feel like it has more square footage, they can make a big difference in how tight or open the space feels.

    Choose Raised Furniture

    Finally, when shopping for furniture, choose options that sit off the ground. The openness underneath actually gives the impression of more space in the room. While this is just an illusion, it has a big visual impact.

    Whether you’re wanting to enjoy your home more fully or prepping it to sell, making it feel larger will help. With these strategies, you can add the feeling of more square footage to your space, even without tackling a remodel.

     




    Categories: Uncategorized  


    Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 1/5/2020

    If you receive a "lowball" offer to purchase your house, your first reaction may be to respond with an immediate "No." However, it is important to evaluate any offer to purchase your house closely. Because if you weigh the pros and cons of rejecting an offer to purchase your home, you'll be better equipped than ever before to make an informed decision about any homebuying proposal you receive.

    Now, let's take a look at three factors to consider before you reject an offer to purchase your residence.

    1. Your Home's Price

    What you may consider to be a lowball offer to purchase your home may actually be a competitive homebuying proposal it all depends on the current state of the housing market. Thus, if you analyze the housing market, you can find out how your home's price stacks up against the prices of comparable houses and review an offer to purchase accordingly.

    If you find your home's price falls in line with similar houses in your city or town, you likely have a competitive initial asking price in place. And if a buyer's offer to purchase your home falls short of your house's initial asking price, you may want to decline the proposal.

    On the other hand, if your home is priced much higher than comparable residences in your area, you may want to adjust your home selling expectations. In this instance, you may find a lowball offer to purchase turns out to be a competitive homebuying proposal. As a result, you may be more inclined to accept the proposal based on the current housing market's conditions.

    2. Your Home's Condition

    Oftentimes, buyers will account for potential home repairs or upgrades they will need to complete if they acquire a house. This means a buyer may submit an offer to purchase below a seller's initial asking price due to the fact that a house may require assorted repairs or upgrades in the near future.

    Take a look at the condition of your home you'll be glad you did. If you find your home is in need of significant repairs or upgrades, you may want to consider these projects before you reject a buyer's offer to purchase your house.

    3. Your Home Selling Goals

    It generally is a good idea to start the home selling journey with goals in hand. That way, if an offer to purchase your house allows you to achieve your home selling goals, you can accept the proposal. Or, if an offer to purchase your house moves you further away from accomplishing your home selling goals, you can reject the proposal.

    As you get set to complete the home selling journey, you may want to hire a real estate agent too. This housing market professional can help you assess any offers to purchase your house, at any time. By doing so, a real estate agent can help you determine how to proceed with an offer to purchase and ensure you can make the best-possible decision.







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